Climate

Afforestation And Global Warming: How Is This Approach Playing Out Globally?

Over the last decade, global warming and climate change have dominated the talks at major events and conferences. Politicians and global leaders have spent thousands of dollars campaigning the idea of helping combat global warming. As such, afforestation and global warming have been two of the most talked-about topics, debating how the former could mitigate the latter.

Our Earth has constantly been trying to cope with the way humans use natural resources, clear forest lands, cut trees, and contaminate the air, land, and water. The industrial revolution, population bursts, and pollution create tons of permanent damage, resulting in global warming and climate change

In such situations, afforestation has always been seen as a critical solution to global warming, a significant climate change reduction strategy even recommended by the UN. And there is tons of research out there that will tell you just that.

A forest’s role

The idea that planting trees will aid in the cooling of the planet makes logical sense, which is why this idea has grown popular among humans. Everyone has probably heard one person or the other calling the Amazon rainforest the “lungs” of the earth. We know that forests absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, thus acting as carbon sinks.

This would result in the partial offsetting of our own industrial and agricultural pollution. Forests are also known to cause a drop in temperature in their surroundings because of transpiration, as water travels from the roots to the leaves, evaporating into the surrounding air.

205 million tonnes of carbon

4.4 billion hectares is the estimated potential area of land cover in the coming decades, a number that far exceeds the current one. New research predicts that if the whole world were to contribute to a joined planting program, these new forests would have the potential to store more than 205 million tonnes of carbon.

This is about two-thirds of the 300 billion tonnes of carbon that has been released into the atmosphere as a result of human activity since the Industrial Revolution. The research says that this places ecosystem restoration and afforestation as the most effective solution at our disposal to mitigate climate change. It ensures that global warming is reduced due to afforestation.

It’s easy

Tree planting is a solution to global warming that doesn’t require President Donald Trump to immediately start believing in climate change, and it definitely doesn’t demand scientists to come up with technological solutions to extract carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere. It’s something that is available now all over the world.

It’s probably the cheapest solution possible, and it makes it easy for everyone to get involved, reinforcing a common goal for everyone to work toward. Organizations like the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) support people all around the world trying to make a difference. Everyone has the capability to make a tangible impact whether it be through donating money to NGOs like WWF or planting trees on their own. Everyone can make a difference.

Demand vs supply

In today’s day and age, products from trees and forests are in extremely high demand. Whether it be something as simple as a piece of paper or something like a forest-based face cleanser, people want it. However, the problem with this is that the rate at which trees naturally grow in forests is much slower than the rate at which trees in forests are being cut down for production.

This increased demand for tree products has put pressure on companies to obtain them by all necessary means, resulting in added stress on forests because of the endless deforestation. Afforestation is the leading effort in helping alleviate this burden on natural forests by providing a more reliable source of tree products. 

This allows companies to use barren land to replant forests and use those trees to satisfy the needs of the people. Afforestation can be the key to leveling the demand from us and the supply from nature, ensuring that we still have a chance against global warming.

Supplying homes throughout nature

When forests diminish, the wildlife does too. Wild animals suffer the most when humans invade forests, destroying everything in their paths. Today, most of the places humans have built their apartments and stadiums used to be homes for wildlife. 

As human activity continues to expand, the number of wildlife living in unprotected areas dwindles while the number of animals on the WWF’s list of endangered species increases. Unless drastic measures are set into motion, most of these animals will become extinct.
This is where afforestation jumps in the rescue the day. It will aide in ensuring that there will be enough forests for wildlife to thrive in. Instead of forcing animals out of their natural habitats, humans will have another source of trees to extract what they need without affecting the wildlife and encouraging the alleviation of global warming. For this reason, afforestation and global warming are largely connected, with one being one of the best solutions to the other.

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Dinesh Goswami

Meet Dinesh Goswami, an electrical engineering graduate who unearthed his escape in poems and proses to grow a knack for curating web content. You might spot him capturing skies and collecting random conversations with strangers. This tech nerd still finds it arduous to call himself a writer.

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